Why it makes sense that fasting enhances cognition

Our ancestors were adapted to an environment of food scarcity.  It has only been in the last century that people are eating three refined meals a day plus snacks in between, all the while becoming more sedentary.  If the conditions of starvation decreased our cognitive ability, they would lead to death. Survival for our ancestors meant that they needed to be smarter about finding food and recalling where they had previously found food during periods of starvation.

Research proves that when we fast, our cognitive abilities improve.  During fasting, levels of the neurohormone norepinephrine increases leading to enhanced mental focus and an increase in memory storage and retrieval.

Once the easily-accessible stores of energy in the form of sugars are exhausted, fasting leads to a state known as ketosis. In a state of ketosis, metabolism is based mainly on burning of fat stores rather than sugar stores. There is evidence that the brain runs more efficiently on ketones (the product of ketosis), especially in patients with Alzheimer’s Disease.
This knowledge is not new: it has just been forgotten. Ancient Greek philosophers such as Pythagoras required fasting of their students in order to help them improve mental focus. Medieval monks and scholars combined frequent fasting with lifestyles of astonishing intellectual output.

Most people believe that food makes you concentrate better and that if you fast, you cannot concentrate.  It is however, the opposite.  For instance, after a large Sunday lunch, do you feel mentally sharp? Most people are very tired after a large meal, we call this a “food coma”.

However, when we are hungry, we are more driven to look for food, for opportunities, for promotions!
For cognitive health, we suggest fasting between 12-16 hours every day.  This usually means that you need to maintain a 12 hour gap between your evening meal and breakfast the following day.

You may find fasting difficult at first, but as people begin to notice the benefits of fasting, they are more inclined to continue.
Note: If we have identified a blood sugar regulation issue, please speak with us about how to tailor your fasts.

What you can do now:

Introduce a fasting period of 12-14 hours each day.  You may have water, organic tea and coffee during the fasting period.

Why it makes sense that fasting enhances cognition

Our ancestors were adapted to an environment of food scarcity.  It has only been in the last century that people are eating three refined meals a day plus snacks in between, all the while becoming more sedentary.  If the conditions of starvation decreased our cognitive ability, they would lead to death. Survival for our ancestors meant that they needed to be smarter about finding food and recalling where they had previously found food during periods of starvation.

Research proves that when we fast, our cognitive abilities improve.  During fasting, levels of the neurohormone norepinephrine increases leading to enhanced mental focus and an increase in memory storage and retrieval.

Once the easily-accessible stores of energy in the form of sugars are exhausted, fasting leads to a state known as ketosis. In a state of ketosis, metabolism is based mainly on burning of fat stores rather than sugar stores. There is evidence that the brain runs more efficiently on ketones (the product of ketosis), especially in patients with Alzheimer’s Disease.
This knowledge is not new: it has just been forgotten. Ancient Greek philosophers such as Pythagoras required fasting of their students in order to help them improve mental focus. Medieval monks and scholars combined frequent fasting with lifestyles of astonishing intellectual output.

Most people believe that food makes you concentrate better and that if you fast, you cannot concentrate.  It is however, the opposite.  For instance, after a large Sunday lunch, do you feel mentally sharp? Most people are very tired after a large meal, we call this a “food coma”.

However, when we are hungry, we are more driven to look for food, for opportunities, for promotions!
For cognitive health, we suggest fasting between 12-16 hours every day.  This usually means that you need to maintain a 12 hour gap between your evening meal and breakfast the following day.

You may find fasting difficult at first, but as people begin to notice the benefits of fasting, they are more inclined to continue.
Note: If we have identified a blood sugar regulation issue, please speak with us about how to tailor your fasts.

What you can do now:

Introduce a fasting period of 12-14 hours each day.  You may have water, organic tea and coffee during the fasting period.